It is official – no protection for Afrikaans at UFS

Chief Justice Mongoeng’s recent statement on the University of the Freestate’s (UFS) language policy (delivered in the colonial English language) reaffirms his hatred against the Afrikaner as it has already emerged in his political ruling on 21 July 2016 regarding the change of street names in Pretoria.

Two of his co-rulers Froneman and Cameron judged that verdict as meaning that “any reliance at white South Africans, especially white Afrikaner people, on a cultural tradition founded in history, finds no recognition in the Constitution, because that history is rooted in oppression.”

“In Afrikaans, the Boer Afrikaner and his culture do not enjoy protection under the SA Constitution.” This is the conclusion of the HNP leader, Mr. Andries Breytenbach following the verdict that Kovsies now declared unilingual English.”

“In his statement about UFS language policy, Mongoeng found among other things that ‘evidence has shown that the university’s dual language policy seems to have sown division, intensified racial tension and is simply not working.’”

“’The university is in effect saying that the use of Afrikaans has unintentionally become a facilitator of ethnic or cultural separation and racial tension. Its continued use would leave the results of white supremacy not being reddressed but be kept alive and well. It is for that reason that a policy revision or intervention has since become necessary.’

Mr. Breytenbach says it is remarkable that whenever Afrikaans and the Afrikaner are concerned, it is found that this is the source of hatred, division, and oppression. “Never English or members of other peoples are a source of division, even if people who do not understand or want to understand Afrikaans, interfere in Afrikaans institutions and demand that such institutions be” transformed “to accommodate them.

“Our people must take note: The Constitutional Court’s view is that the Afrikaner and his culture do not enjoy protection under the SA Constitution. The Court’s statements confirm this.”

“We have to ask ourselves: why should we still submit to such a constitution?”

“The Afrikaner border farmers found themselves in a similar situation in the 1830s. Therefore, they decided to withdraw under British rule and establish their own state where they could make their own laws.”

“This principle of its own state under its own government is the best way for the Boer Afrikaner people today. Let’s do it for us,” said Mr. Breytenbach.

Adv. Anton Alberts of FF Plus regards the statement as “a major setback for mother tongue education and the development of indigenous languages in South Africa.”

Adv. Alberts said it is a sad decision, as one of the most basic human rights is thereby subjected to what is cosmetically politically correct.

“It is regrettable that mother tongue education as endorsed by the Constitution is seen as a barrier to racial relations and that the Constitutional Court gives the previous parallel language policy the burden of racial segregation.”

“The FF Plus believes that the ANC government has had the opportunity to build more universities over the last 23 years and put in place other measures to implement the Constitution’s provision that states that everyone has the right to receive teachings in the official language of his or her choice.”

“The verdict also contradicts international law that promotes mother tongue education and internal self-determination about language,” said adv. Alberts.

Read the original article in Afrikaans on Die Vryburger


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